Tip #1: Temporarily Securing Miniatures to Bases for Painting - fddlstyx
There will often be times when pinning is not a valid option. This comes up quite frequently with the 30mm KDM models, which usually have very slender legs and small soles, making it difficult to drill through without damaging the model.
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Tip #1: Temporarily Securing Miniatures to Bases for Painting

There will often be times when pinning is not a valid option. This comes up quite frequently with the 30mm KDM models, which usually have very slender legs and small soles, making it difficult to drill through without damaging the model.

When I first started painting, my solution was to apply a very small amount of super glue to the bottom of the model, and then attach it onto my painting base. This method worked fine up until the point where the model needed to be removed from the painting base. A process which occasionally ended up in cracked legs or ankles due to the excessive amount of force needed to pull it off.

Enter Loctite Fun-Tak, which is basically just a sticky putty that comes in thin strips.

 

You rip some off and kneed it until it becomes soft, then press it down onto the painting base, creating a nice adhesive surface for the model. The hold is quite strong, and keeps the model locked steadily in place when painting or airbrushing.

 

It’s very cheap (~$4.99 @ Target), leaves little residue, and one package will last forever. I ¬†greatly prefer it over double sided tape as it is much easier to shape it to exactly the size that you need, allowing you to use much less.

-styx

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